A Subsidiary of Provocate.org

Welcome to IndyBuzz

IndyBuzz provides information about Central Indiana's most stimulating and thought provoking events -- discussions and conferences, art exhibitions, films, music performances. It tells you what's happening … explains why you should be part of what’s happening. More than an events calendar, though, IndyBuzz tries to make events more meaningful for participants by suggesting an article or two to read before the event, recommending books or websites that will be sources of further information after the event, and pointing out related events that are worth attending.

Visit IndyBuzz's sister site, http://www.provocate.org/, which provides a context for the clusters of the events discussed in IndyBuzz.

Navigating IndyBuzz in the Spring

To prevent this blog from being too cumbersome, use this post as your navigation tool. It has a chronological listing of all the upcoming events for the spring ... about 68 events at latest counting. (This is an intellectually active and culturally engaged community!)

At the bottom of each individual posting you'll find a link:






The bottom of each posting is likely also to have a link to a posting that has the events organized by themes:






You can scroll down through the entire blog, which is in rough chronological order (because of the way blogs work, this requires entering postings in reverse order, the most distant in the future first). But as I learn about and research additional events, the chronological order will get rougher and rougher. When in doubt, click on the Return to Navigating IndyBuzz link, and you should come to this posting.

All this is intended to help go where you know you want to go while still exploring unfamilar territory, to find what you want to find and to find what you didn't know you really wanted to find until you stumbled onto it.

As always, please tell me about any events you think should be IndyBuzzed. E-mail me at John@sipr.org.

The latest pass of IndyBuzz-recommended events:

March 30: Observe Nin Andrews and Brady's Leap push the bounds of intellectualized sexuality

March 31: Ask film expert Dennis Bingham of IUPUI "who deserves a biopic?"

April 1 and 2: Consume your music as a happening with Orkestra Projekt

April 3: Join a Community Summit on Citizen Diplomacy at Marian College

April 4: Get riled at the ACLU's debate over same-sex marriage

April 5: Hear University of Indianapolis professor Milind Thakar analyze US-Iran relations

April 5: Hear about "Israelis and Palestinians: After the elections ... what next?" from Israeli Consul General Barukh Binah

April 5: Chat with Ambassador Joseph Huggins about Africa

April 6: Seize another chance to hear Barukh Binah on the Middle East

April 6: Head to Purdue to hear Lech Wałęsa

April 7: It's First Friday, get out and appreciate some art

April 8: ¡Tango con Tanguísimo!

April 12: Watch Steven Pinker, the world's foremost popularizer of cognitive psychology, and his hair

April 12: Hear Fran Quigley on human rights and the war against terrorism

April 13: Join Chinese dissident and possible Nobel Prize winner Bei Dao

April 13: Shake up your liberal modern worldview with Victor Davis Hanson

April 18: Join a discussion of “Latin America - The political environment and economic opportunities with a look at Cuba

April 18: Listen to prize-winning Nigerian writer Chris Abani

April 19: Take your second chance to hear Charles Dhanaraj explain whether China and India are rivals or allies

April 19: Hear the historian Forrest McDonald tell us why we are in trouble

April 19: Get your paranoia fix when David Rothkopf talks about the shadowy National Security Council and US politics

April 21: Be the first to hear the results of Sagamore institute's study of the economic relations between Indiana and Mexico

April 24: Learn about why the eventual democratization of China is great news for our grandchildren, but maybe not such a good deal for us today

April 25: Warm up for the International Film Festival with a very special opera performance

April 25: Be the first kid on your block to have an autographed copy of Milton Viorst's new book, Storm From the East: The Struggle Between the Arab World and the Christian West

April 26: Discuss energy security with John Clark

April 26 to May 4: Spend nine days at the International Film Festival of Indianapolis!

April 27: Hear selections from the opera Turandot performed while viewing works from the greatest living Chinese traditional artist

May 3: Talk Turkey with Çiğdem Balım of IU

May 3: Hear Sally Pipes on market-based solutions for the American health crisis

May 10: Discuss pandemics and global security with Eric Meslin of the Center for Bioethics

May 15: Celebrate USAID director Randall Tobias, Indianapolis International Citizen of the Year

May 17: Join another discussion of UN Reform with Ed DeLaney

May 24: Analyze Brazil with Craig Auchter of Butler University


Return to Themes underpinning IndyBuzz

The themes underpinning IndyBuzz this Spring

One of the goals of IndyBuzz is to help connect the fragmented pieces of many different conversations and discussions that are happening around the city. A few themes connect most of the events IndyBuzz is covering and recommending this spring.


Africa
Feb. 5: Watch Nigerian artist Prince Twins Seven-Seven work wood magic
Feb. 15: Engage with activist Salih Booker on what Americans can do to help Africa
Feb. 16: Watch the film Moolaadé on female genital mutilation in Africa
Feb. 19: Come to Marian College to hear Senator Richard Lugar
Feb. 23: Watch the African film "Daughters of Keltoum"
March 15: Join the ICWA as Laura Engelbrecht shares her experiences with child soldiers in Africa
April 3: Join a Community Summit on Citizen Diplomacy at Marian College
April 18: Listen to prize-winning Nigerian writer Chris Abani
April 26 to May 4: Spend nine days at the International Film Festival of Indianapolis!
May 15: Celebrate USAID director Randall Tobias, Indianapolis International Citizen of the Year


Art
Feb. 5: Watch Nigerian artist Prince Twins Seven-Seven work wood magic
Feb. 21: Watch Master Au Ho-nien at work at the University of Indianapolis!


Business
Feb. 2: Listen to Doctor Richard Gunderman on "Doing Well By Doing Good" in medicine
March 1: Attend an Employer’s Forum on "Working with the World -- Effective Intercultural Communication"
March 8: Attend a major conference on "The Health Care Conundrum"
March 15: Listen to a talk by Jim McClelland, a giant of Central Indiana’s nonprofit sector
March 21: Come hear Steve Akard explain the Indiana Economic Development Corporation’s global goals
March 28: Seize your first chance to hear Kelley School's Charles Dhanaraj on India and China
April 19: Take your second chance to hear Charles Dhanaraj explain whether China and India are rivals or allies
May 3: Hear Sally Pipes on market-based solutions for the American health crisis


China
Feb. 15: Join IUPUI’s Susan Erickson in a discussion of conflict between India and China
Feb. 19: Come to Marian College to hear Senator Richard Lugar
Feb. 21: Watch Master Au Ho-nien at work at the University of Indianapolis!
March 1: Attend an Employer’s Forum on "Working with the World -- Effective Intercultural Communication"
March 2: Come to Butler to see former President Bush
March 21: Come hear Steve Akard explain the Indiana Economic Development Corporation’s global goals
March 28: Seize your first chance to hear Kelley School's Charles Dhanaraj on India and China
April 13: Join Chinese dissident and possible Nobel Prize winner Bei Dao
April 19: Take your second chance to hear Charles Dhanaraj explain whether China and India are rivals or allies
April 26 to May 4: Spend nine days at the International Film Festival of Indianapolis!


Energy politics
Feb. 8: Join a discussion the global politics of energy led by electrical engineer Dick Davis
Feb. 15: Hear journalist Odil Ruzaliev explain the crisis in his native Uzbekistan
Feb. 21: Hear Butler’s Peter Grossman on "The energy policy conundrum"
March 21: Listen to Central Asia Productivity Research Center head Harry Lepinske talk about Turkey
April 26: Discuss energy security with John Clark


Europe
Feb. 19: Come to Marian College to hear Senator Richard Lugar
Feb. 21: Listen to IUPUI’s Robert White on Terrorism in Ireland (and buy his new book)
Feb. 24: Chat with Kós András, the diplomat who negotiated Hungary into the European Union
April 26 to May 4: Spend nine days at the International Film Festival of Indianapolis!


Faith and religion
Jan. 30: Hear JC Watts talks about faith, race, and leadership
Jan. 31: Attend a discussion of "The Coverage of Religion in the Middle East"
Feb. 7: Join the ACLU for a discussion of “Intelligent Design in Science Class?
Feb. 28: Come to Butler for a discussion of "The Search for God and Meaning in Contemporary Film"
March 4: Attend a conference on “The Realms of Science and Faith” at IUPUI
March 4: Attend a Darwin Day Conference at IUPUI
March 16: Spin, Spin and Touch the Divine with Sufis at IMA
April 3: Join a Community Summit on Citizen Diplomacy at Marian College


Film
Feb. 11: Come to the Eiteljorg for “Shadows of High Noon: Legacies of an American Icon
Feb. 23: Watch the African film "Daughters of Keltoum"
Feb. 28: Come to Butler for a discussion of "The Search for God and Meaning in Contemporary Film"
March 18: Watch “Alice,” Jan Švankmajer's distressingly beautiful film of Alice in Wonderland
March 31: Ask film expert Dennis Bingham of IUPUI "who deserves a biopic?"
April 26 to May 4: Spend nine days at the International Film Festival of Indianapolis!


Global public health
Feb. 28: Prepare to have your world rocked by Sarah Archer on global pandemics and security
March 15: Be both frightened and reassured by Sarah Archer's discussion of pandemics and global security
May 10: Discuss pandemics and global security with Eric Meslin of the Center for Bioethics
May 15: Celebrate USAID director Randall Tobias, Indianapolis International Citizen of the Year


Global trade
Feb. 19: Come to Marian College to hear Senator Richard Lugar
March 1: Attend an Employer’s Forum on "Working with the World -- Effective Intercultural Communication"
March 21: Listen to Central Asia Productivity Research Center head Harry Lepinske talk about Turkey
March 21: Come hear Steve Akard explain the Indiana Economic Development Corporation’s global goals
March 28: Seize your first chance to hear Kelley School's Charles Dhanaraj on India and China
April 19: Take your second chance to hear Charles Dhanaraj explain whether China and India are rivals or allies
April 21: Join a discussion of “Latin America - The political environment and economic opportunities with a look at Cuba


Health and medicine
Feb. 2: Listen to doctor Richard Gunderman on "Doing Well By Doing Good" in medicine
Feb. 22: Come IUPUI for the Joseph Taylor Symposium -- “The Crisis in Urban Health Care”
Feb. 28: Prepare to have your world rocked by Sarah Archer on global pandemics and security
March 8: Attend a major conference on "The Health Care Conundrum"
March 15: Be both frightened and reassured by Sarah Archer's discussion of pandemics and global security
May 3: Hear Sally Pipes on market-based solutions for the American health crisis
May 10: Discuss pandemics and global security with Eric Meslin of the Center for Bioethics


Human and civil rights
Feb. 19: Come to Marian College to hear Senator Richard Lugar
March 1: Hear Sheila Kennedy on preserving human rights in the war on terrorism
March 7: Join the ACLU in their discussion about the US government spying on Americans
March 14: Hear Fran Quigley of the ACLU-Indiana on human rights in an age of terrorism
April 12: Hear Fran Quigley on human rights and the war against terrorism
May 17: Join another discussion of UN Reform with Ed DeLaney


India
Feb. 15: Join IUPUI’s Susan Erickson in a discussion of conflict between India and China
Feb. 21: Join a World Trade Club discussion of "Trade with India - The Other Asian Giant"
March 1: Attend an Employer’s Forum on "Working with the World -- Effective Intercultural Communication"
March 28: Seize your first chance to hear Kelley School's Charles Dhanaraj on India and China
April 19: Take your second chance to hear Charles Dhanaraj explain whether China and India are rivals or allies


Journalism
Jan. 31: Attend a discussion of "The Coverage of Religion in the Middle East"
Feb. 15: Hear journalist Odil Ruzaliev explain the crisis in his native Uzbekistan
March 20: Hear journalists from Lebanon and the US on the Middle East and its evolving news media


Latin America
Feb. 19: Come to Marian College to hear Senator Richard Lugar
Feb.22: Hear John Clark discuss Brazil, the eternal “next superpower”
Feb. 25: Hear the Masters of Mariachi: Los Comperos de Nati Cano
March 7: Welcome GeoPol analyst Pedro Cardoso talking about Brazil
April 3: Join a Community Summit on Citizen Diplomacy at Marian College
April 8: ¡Tango con Tanguísimo!
April 21: Join a discussion of “Latin America - The political environment and economic opportunities with a look at Cuba
April 26 to May 4: Spend nine days at the International Film Festival of Indianapolis!
May 24: Analyze Brazil with Craig Auchter of Butler University


Literature
March 20: Talk with novelist and essayist Nick Hornby
March 30: Observe Nin Andrews and Brady's Leap push the bounds of intellectualized sexuality
April 13: Join Chinese dissident and possible Nobel Prize winner Bei Dao
April 18: Listen to prize-winning Nigerian writer Chris Abani


Middle East
Jan. 31: Attend a discussion of "The Coverage of Religion in the Middle East"
Feb. 1: Join Charles Winslow to discuss US-Iran relations
Feb. 14: Hear DePauw’s Sean Foley discuss US-Iran relations
Feb. 19: Come to Marian College to hear Senator Richard Lugar
March 2: Come to Butler to see former President Bush
March 8: Hear IUPUI’s Scott Pegg explain where Turkey is headed
March 20: Hear journalists from Lebanon and the US on the Middle East and its evolving news media
April 3: Join a Community Summit on Citizen Diplomacy at Marian College
April 5: Hear University of Indianapolis professor Milind Thakar analyze US-Iran relations
April 26: Discuss energy security with John Clark
April 26 to May 4: Spend nine days at the International Film Festival of Indianapolis!


Music
Feb. 25: Hear the Masters of Mariachi: Los Comperos de Nati Cano
March 10 and 12: Attend Indianapolis Opera’s performance of "The Marriage of Figaro"
March 16: Spin, Spin and Touch the Divine with Sufis at IMA
March 30: Observe Nin Andrews and Brady's Leap push the bounds of intellectualized sexuality
April 8: ¡Tango con Tanguísimo!
April 26 to May 4: Spend nine days at the International Film Festival of Indianapolis!


Philanthropy
Feb. 2: Listen to doctor Richard Gunderman on "Doing Well By Doing Good" in medicine
March 15: Listen to a talk by Jim McClelland, a giant of Central Indiana’s nonprofit sector
April 3: Join a Community Summit on Citizen Diplomacy at Marian College


Political leadership
Jan. 30: Hear JC Watts talks about faith, race, and leadership
Feb. 6: Hear conservative pundit Deroy Murdock at the Economic Club
Feb. 19: Come to Marian College to hear Senator Richard Lugar
March 2: Come to Butler to see former President Bush
April 19: Hear the historian Forrest McDonald tell us why we are in trouble
May 15: Celebrate USAID director Randall Tobias, Indianapolis International Citizen of the Year


Race and ethnicity
Jan. 30: Hear JC Watts talks about faith, race, and leadership
Feb. 6: Hear conservative pundit Deroy Murdock at the Economic Club
Feb. 22: Come IUPUI for the Joseph Taylor Symposium -- “The Crisis in Urban Health Care.”
Feb. 23: Watch the African film "Daughters of Keltoum"


Science and society
Feb. 7: Join the ACLU for a discussion of “Intelligent Design in Science Class?
Feb. 8: Listen to astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson on “The Cosmic Perspective”
March 4: Attend a conference on “The Realms of Science and Faith” at IUPUI,
March 4: Attend a Darwin Day Conference at IUPUI
April 12: Watch Steven Pinker, the world's foremost popularizer of cognitive psychology, and his hair


The United Nations
Feb. 7: Hear Ed DeLaney analyze the UN’s need for reform
Feb. 19: Come to Marian College to hear Senator Richard Lugar
March 2: Come to Butler to see former President Bush
May 17: Join another discussion of UN Reform with Ed DeLaney


Turkey
Feb. 24: Chat with Kós András, the diplomat who negotiated Hungary into the European Union
March 8: Hear IUPUI’s Scott Pegg explain where Turkey is headed
March 16: Spin, Spin and Touch the Divine with Sufis at IMA
March 21: Listen to Central Asia Productivity Research Center head Harry Lepinske talk about Turkey
May 3: Talk Turkey with Çiğdem Balım of IU


US foreign policy
Feb. 1: Join Charles Winslow to discuss US-Iran relations
Feb. 6: Hear conservative pundit Deroy Murdock at the Economic Club
Feb. 7: Hear Ed DeLaney analyze the UN’s need for reform
Feb. 14: Hear DePauw’s Sean Foley discuss US-Iran relations
Feb. 15: Engage with activist Salih Booker on what Americans can do to help Africa
Feb. 15: Hear journalist Odil Ruzaliev explain the crisis in his native Uzbekistan
Feb. 15: Join IUPUI’s Susan Erickson in a discussion of conflict between India and China
Feb. 19: Come to Marian College to hear Senator Richard Lugar
Feb. 24: Chat with Kós András, the diplomat who negotiated Hungary into the European Union
March 2: Come to Butler to see former President Bush
March 8: Hear IUPUI’s Scott Pegg explain where Turkey is headed
March 15: Join the ICWA as Laura Engelbrecht shares her experiences with child soldiers in Africa
April 3: Join a Community Summit on Citizen Diplomacy at Marian College
April 26: Discuss energy security with John Clark
May 15: Celebrate USAID director Randall Tobias, Indianapolis International Citizen of the Year
May 17: Join another discussion of UN Reform with Ed DeLaney
May 24: Analyze Brazil with Craig Auchter of Butler University

April 3: Community Summit on Citizen Diplomacy

More information will appear about this very important event shortly

When: Monday April 3, Time TBA (in the afternoon, approximately 2-3 hours long)

Where: Indianapolis Civic Theatre at Marian College 3200 Cold Springs Road, Indianapolis

Some background to this event. The Coalition for Citizen Diplomacy has launched a national campaign to increase dramatically the ability of Americans to engage with the global community through international dialogue and exchanges. At the forefront of the campaign is a series of Community Summits being held across the United States, which will culminate in a National Summit on Citizen Diplomacy in Washington, D.C. in July 2006. Community Summits help raise public awareness of the international interests of the host community and provide a forum for participants to exchange perspectives on issues that affect the community’s global engagement. The Summits will also serve to identify and expand resources and partnerships, to build a network of like-minded citizens, and to propose action plans that will be presented at the National Summit.

Here's why this Indianapolis Summit on April 3rd matters very much. "Citizen diplomacy" is stronger here than in many other communities. If you want a flavor, just check out the articles by Fran Quigley in NUVO ... there are hundreds, perhaps thousands of local efforts to address international issues. Look at the program IU Medical School has in Kenya, or the Nigerian village Scott Pegg has adopted, or the work the Rotary Club has been doing in Jamaica for a decade. Churches, schools, colleges, service clubs, ethnic associations, businesses ... all forming connections with counterparts around the world. And they are just dispensing warm and fuzzy hugs to the world. They are working hard with their local partners to solve problems -- providing HIV/AIDS treatment, assisting poor women set up businesses with microloans, pitching in to help build orphanages and repair hurricane damage ... and in many cases they are more effective than "official" aid coming out of DC.

I call these local-to-local partnerships to solve global problems. These, I think, are different than what the Coalition for Citizen Diplomacy means by the idea of "citizen diplomacy." These aren't exchanges to foster mutual understanding, although they try to do that. These partnerships are carrying out independent nongovernmental foreign policies, not only "diplomacy."

That means this summit could be quite important for helping connect and mobilize these independent initiatives. It could be a way to frame more purposefully and intentionally the discussions across Indianapolis this spring that IndyBuzz has been laying out.

A couple of organizations, Americans for Informed Democracy and Citizens for Global Solutions, will help us use the opportunity of this summit to provide communication and strategic training for "citizen diplomats," for students and community leaders who are represent to world to Indiana and Indiana to the world. Both training programs draw from a package called US in the World that looks very good, you should check it out. And stay tuned for details.

Congressman Dan Burton, chair of the Western Hemisphere subcommittee on the House International Relations committee, will be the keynote speaker of the summit. Cost: $10 per person ($5 per student), details for registration to follow.

Check back with IndyBuzz on this one, it should be big.

In the meantime, if you would like more information on this concept, I would recommend reading up on "public diplomacy." USC has a special program in public diplomacy that has a lot of interesting news and articles. If you want an idea of what the US government thinks, check out the page for Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs Karen Hughes. The Rand Corporation came out with a study, "Public Diplomacy: How to Think About and Improve It." Retired employees of the US Information Agency (the official wing of old-style public diplomacy, aka propaganda) have information, as does a report by the Council on Foreign Relations on communicating better with Muslims. As I say, the groups here in town fully engaged in solving problems are doing deeper and more effective work than this.

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March 4: Darwin Day Conference

A conference looking at the achievements of Charles Darwin, and how his scientific legacy is under assault today

When: Saturday, March 4, Saturday, March 4, 8:00 AM-6:00 PM
Where: IUPUI Lecture Hall LE 100

The Darwin Day Conference is organized by the Center for Inquiry Community of Indiana.

Darwin Day celebrations take place all over the world, usually on February 12, the anniversary of Darwin's birth. In 2009 Darwin hits the big two-oh-oh, expect a big deal for Darwin day then.

If you like this event, you should check out the CFI Community of Indiana's webpage: they have a lot of activities just about every week, from reading groups to picnics. You should also attend some of the events this spring such as the talks by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson on February 8 and by cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker April 12. You also might check out the discussion of "Intelligent Design" the ACLU-indiana is staging at IRT February 7.

For more information about the Darwin Day conference, contact Reba Woodson at cfiindy@insightbb.com.

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March 2: Former President Bush speaks at Butler


Honored sesquicentennial speaker and former President George H.W. Bush will speak at Butler University in an event co-sponsored by the Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series.

When: Thursday March 2, 7:00 PM (Attendees will need to be seated for the event by 6:30 p.m.)

Where: Butler University Hinkle Fieldhouse

George Bush was elected President of the United States in 1988 and served until 1993. He had previously served as vice president under President Ronald Reagan from 1981-1989. President Bush’s career in politics and public service began in 1963, and it has never really ended. Since leaving office, President Bush has written two books — A World Transformed, co-authored with General Brent Scowcroft, on foreign policy during his administration, and All The Best, a collection of letters written throughout his life. He has visited 56 foreign countries, most of the 50 states and has helped to raise millions of dollars for a variety of charitable organizations, including relief from the 2004 Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina.

You'll have several opportuities to see American statesmen and political leaders. You can compare former president Bush with Senator Lugar February 19, former Rep. J.C. Watts January 30, Indiana Rep. Dan Burton at the Citizen Diplomacy Summit on April 3, and USAID head Randall Tobias May 15.

As you can imagine, there is a lot written about George Bush I. I would recommend looking at this New Yorker article about the foreign policy views of his foreign policy alter-ego, Brent Scowcroft. HW is loyal to his son, but there have to be times when dad shakes his head in confusion and dismay over current US foreign policy. Wonder if he will talk about that at Butler?
This event is free, but getting a ticket will be a chore.

Alumni, faculty, staff and students can obtain tickets at the Clowes Memorial Hall box office on Monday, Jan. 23, 2006. There will be two distribution times: at 8 a.m., with lines forming at 7 a.m., and at 6 p.m., with lines forming at 5:30 p.m. (An equal number of tickets will be distributed during both distribution times.) Faculty, staff and students must show a Butler identification card. Alumni will need to bring the 10-digit code from the address label on any issue of Butler Magazine to obtain tickets at the box office.

A limited number of tickets will be distributed to out-of-town alumni through an e-mail request system. For the purposes of this event, "out of town" means more than 30 miles from campus. To request these tickets, send an e-mail to presidentialtickets@butler.edu, on Jan. 23, 2006. The e-mail must contain your name, class year and mailing address. These tickets will be distributed first-come/first-served, based on the date/time stamp on your e-mail. You will be notified as to whether or not we are able to fulfill your request no later than Feb. 5.

On Feb. 6, remaining tickets will be made available to the general public beginning at 8 a.m. (line forms at 7 a.m.) at the Clowes Memorial Hall box office. (It will be interesting to see how the lines compare to the queues who waited forBill Clinton tickets in the fall.)

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Jan. 30: JC Watts talks about faith, race, and leadership


Former Congressman J.C. Watts to comes to Butler University to give a talk called “Join Hands for Results” as part of Celebration of Diversity Distinguished Lecture Series

When: Monday January 30, 7:30-10:30 PM

Where: Butler University Clowes Hall Auditorium

J.C. Watts is former Oklahoma Congressman and author of What Color is a Conservative? Rising from small town origins, Watts became a high-profile congressman who served as chairman of the House Republican Conference and honorary co-chair of the Republican National Convention in 2000. Statesman, ordained minister, political commentator and athlete, Watts’ concerns encompass the world — from AIDS relief in Africa to issues in his native Oklahoma. Watts has recently joined CNN as a commentator.

You might want to compare Watts to a few other conservative politicians: Sen. Lugar will speak on February 19, Rep. Dan Burton on April 3. You can hear another conservative who happens to be African American when Deroy Murdock speaks February 6.

Tickets are free but required for admission and can be obtained at the Clowes Hall box office.

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Jan. 31: A discussion of "Religion Coverage in the Middle East"


A journalist and journalism professor discuss why religion is so poorly covered in the news in the Middle East when it is such an essential part of most of the conflicts

When: Tuesday, January 31, 7:30AM - 10:30PM

Where: Butler University, Clowes Auditorium

War and political conflict dominate news from Israel, the Palestinian territories, Iraq and the rest of the Middle East. And despite the religious diversity of the region and the religious roots of much of the conflict, news coverage in the western media virtually ignores religion. What is the role of religion in the news in the Middle East? Why is it often neglected? And which media around the world are doing good work in this arena?

Speaking about these questions will be Serge Schmemann, editorial page editor for the International Herald Tribune. Schmemann won the Pulitzer Prize for international reporting in 1990. He has spent more than 30 years working in Europe and the Middle East, and is the former Jerusalem bureau chief for the New York Times. Schmemann is the editor and contributor to Israel: The Historic Atlas -- The Story of Israel From Ancient Times to the Modern Nation (1997). Students of Russian politics know him from his excellent book, Echoes of a Native Land : Two Centuries of a Russian Village.

Replying to Schmemann will be David Boeyink, professor of journalism at Indiana University who specializes in media ethics and brings theological training to this work. He holds two graduate degrees, in theology and religious ethics from Harvard University.

Think of this discussion as an excellent introduction to a conversation that will continue throughout the spring. On March 20 at Marian College American journalist Jon Sawyer and Lebanese reporter Habib Battah will discuss how the news media in the Middle East is changing. You'll have three very different opportunities to discuss Iran-US relations since this is part of the "Great Decisions" series being offered by several organizations: Feb. 1, Feb. 14, and April 5. And on February 15 an Uzbek reporter comes to talk about journalism in a country that is waging a brutal war on its enemies, which it claims are Islamic extremists.

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Feb. 1: Charles Winslow talks about US-Iran relations


Charles Winslow, the unofficial dean of Middle Eastern political studies in Central Indiana, discusses whether the US and Iran will fight as part of the Church of the Saviour's "Great Decisions" series

When: Wednesday February 1, 7:00 PM

Where: Church of the Saviour, 6205 Rucker Road Indianapolis

A conundrum for U.S. Administrations for the past quarter century, Iran has a population that may be the most pro-American in the Middle East, while the Iranian government may be the most anti-American. The election of Iran's conservative president has raised concern that hardliners will shape policies against U.S. interests. How can the U.S. check Iran's influence in Iraq, Afghanistan and other countries in the region? How will the U.S. and the international community mitigate the crisis over Iran's nuclear ambitions?

Helping answer these questions will be Charles Winslow, Political Science professor emeritus at IUPUI. For three decades Charlie has been the academic expert of choice for talks like this. He has earned a devoted fan base (of which I am a member).

Although it is not part of this evening's topic, you can read parts of Charlie's fine book, Lebanon: War and Politics in a Fragmented Society for a sense of the clarity and grace of this thought. Want some background to the tense relations between the US and Iran? The Middle East Media Research Institute has translations of the staements of Iranian leaders. Get current news about Iran from Western sources from Yahoo.

You also might like to check out the other Iran-US discussions: Sean Foley of dePauw talks to the Indiana Council on World Affairs February 14, and Milind Thakar talks to the Mid-North Shepherd's Center on April 5. You should also attend the discussions of the news media coverage of and in the Middle East at Butler on January 31, and at Marian College March 20.

Charlie's analysis of Iran's relations with the US could resemble Pedro Cardoso's geo-strategic analysis of US-Brazilian relations on March 7, and Scott Pegg's analysis of relations with Turkey March 8.

If you would like to learn more about Iran, or connect with local groups who care about relations with Iran, you can contact John Clark at john@sipr.org. Or you can contact Charles Winslow at cwinslow@iupui.edu.

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Feb. 2: Richard Gunderman on "Doing Well By Doing Good"



Richard Gunderman offers a new way of thinking about philanthropy and medical arts

When: Thursday February 2, noon to 1:00 PM

Where: IUPUI Medical Library 975 West Walnut Street, Building IB 301-302

Richard Gunderman is Faculty Fellow at the Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence and Co-Director of the Program in Medical Humanities at IUPUI. He is a very smart and thoughtful medical doctor who is trying seriously to think of a new model of philanthropy that might rescue his profession.

What [he asks] is the goal of medical practice? The literature of medical
ethics often seems to suppose that we face two mutually exclusive alternatives:
either to protect the incomes of physicians and healthcare organizations or to
generate value to patients and communities. In this presentation, I argue that
this familiar choice represents a false dichotomy. To be sure, if we understand
the goals of healthcare organizations in strictly financial terms, we are
operating with blinders on, and foregoing opportunities to pursue larger values.
However, there is no reason that a clear sense of professional mission should
not enrich a medical practice in both human and financial terms. Far from
undermining financial performance, ambitious professional ethics can actually
enhance it, achieving a synergism that benefits not only patients and
communities but health professionals as well. This presentation outlines the
possibilities for such synergism with illustrations from everyday medical
practice.

For a sense of what makes Richard's perspective distinctive, check out his article on "Imagining Philanthropy."

If you like this event, you should attend some of the other events related to health and medicine this spring. Hear about the particular problems of inner city health care at the Joseph Taylor Symposium February 22; hear a business perspective at conference March 8; listen to a libertarian diagnosis and prescription on May 3; and contrast all this with what Jim McClelland of Good will has to say March15.

If you want to learn more, you can contact Richard Gunderman at rbgunder@iupui.edu.

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Feb. 5: Watch Twins Seven-Seven work wood magic


Internationally renowned Nigerian artist Prince Twins Seven-Seven helps the IMA open its Eiteljorg Galleries of African Art by creating art before our eyes.

When: Sunday February 5, 2:00-5:00

Where: Indianapolis Museum of Art Blue Art Lab

February is a great month at the IMA. To commemorate the opening of its African art galleries, the IM has a great series of films. And it starts marvelously with Twins Seven-Seven. Here is an article from the Journal of the American Medical Association last year:


He is an artist like no other: painter, draftsman, sculptor, printmaker, metal worker, textile designer; he is also a musician: singer, dancer, bandleader, drummer. He is a writer, a poet. And he has acting credits. His official name is Prince Taiwo Olaniyi Oyewale-Toyeje Oyekale Osuntoki, but he chooses to be known by the simpler, distinctive construction of Twins Seven Seven. Descended from a Nigerian chieftain, Twins Seven Seven (1944- ) was born in Ibadan to a leather worker father and cloth weaver mother; his mother was also a trader in women’s jewelry and clothing. When he was eight years old his father died and he moved with his mother to her ancestral village in the province of Kabba. At age 16 he left school and began the journey that would take him and his art around the world.

The first stop was Lagos, where he became a driver-apprentice, but after two years he went to Oshogbo, where he joined the experimental art workshop of two German artists, Ulli Beier and Suzanne Wenger. Because of the workshop, Oshogbo had become something of a tourist attraction; Twins Seven Seven was soon the center of that attraction.

Twins Seven Seven’s (Ibeji Meje Meje) name alludes to the fact that he was the only survivor in a family that had had seven sets of twins (ibeji meje). "Taiwo" in his original name indicates that he was the first-born twin of the set. (The second born of each pair is called "Kehinde"; though younger, Kehinde is charged with taking care of Taiwo.) If either, Taiwo or Kehinde, died—as was frequently the case—the spirit
of the dead twin was embodied in a wooden carving, ere ibeji, and the surviving twin was responsible for caring for it for as long as it lived. Twins Seven Seven, as the sole surviving member of 14 babies, had an especially heavy duty in caring for the spirits of all his deceased siblings.

Twins Seven Seven completed Healing of Abiku Children when he was in his late twenties. It had been commissioned a year earlier by the Indianapolis physician Dr Hanus Grosz under the general rubric of "Healing." The painting is a depiction of a religious ceremony of the Yoruba people that Twins Seven Seven knew from his own experience. According to Yoruba belief, abiku is a child who is fated to die not long after birth. Rebirth into the same family occurs, but this is followed by early death once again. The cycle continues until the mother brings the child to a divination priest, who, by means of special rituals and incantations to the spirits, persuades the child spirit to remain with its community. In Healing of Abiku Children such a mother is clearly identified. The largest single figure in the painting, she sits on an ornate stool in the foreground holding a twin in her lap, while another sleeps on her back. At her feet are tiny pictures of twins, and in an upward diagonal pointing left, a line of numerous other, seemingly paired children, representing perhaps her previous twin children. Framed in a doorway is the priest mixing potions, while behind him are throngs of people, villagers perhaps come to watch the ceremony. To the right are women arriving with supplies. Throughout the painting are other figures engaged in various other tasks, lavishly decorated structures, elaborate clothing, and, in the upper background, birds, representing perhaps spirits. Not a millimeter of space is left undecorated.

One need not know the narrative or symbolism behind the work to enjoy the painting, however. Like all his work, Healing of Abiku Children is exuberant, flamboyant, attention-grabbing, as Twins Seven Seven is himself said to be. The work is big and bold, busy as a marketplace, lush as an autumn forest; it is as complex as human relationships, as richly layered and as elaborately textured as the finest arras tapestry. The colors are warm and comforting, richly burnished, like sun
on copper. And they are loud, as attention-getting as the blast of the trumpet on judgment day.

Now considered the most famous representative of the Nigerian Oshogbo school of painting, Twins Seven Seven’s work is in museums throughout the world. He was recently (May 2005) named UNESCO Artist for Peace, "in recognition of his contribution to the promotion of dialogue and understanding among peoples, particularly in Africa and the African Diaspora."



We can see "Healing of Abiku Children" at the IMA, and more too. Twins Seven-Seven will work with a flat piece of wood, demonstrating how to turn it into a textured work of art. Very cool.

In fact, we in Indiana have a rare opportunity to compare two master artists at work ... more than just comparing their finished products. On February 21 Marster Au Ho-nien, one of the world's greatest living Chinese artists, will demonstrate his painting skills at the University of Indianapolis. Although they come from very different continents, very different worlds, Master Au and Prince Twins Seven-Seven are similar in many respects. Both are multi-faceted artists and scholars. Both have preserved their local schools of art while adapting them to a global audience. Getting a chance to see both of them create makes February a very special month indeed.

February also offers us a chance to learn much more about African art and life thanks to the IMA's celebration of the opening of the Eiteljorg wing. You can see a couple of important African films: on February 16 Moolaadé (the highly acclaimed film examining genital mutilation in Burkina Faso); on February 23 Daughters of Keltoum. One of Nigeria's greatest writer, Chris Abani, is coming to butler April 18. You can learn much more about the problems facing Africa at the talk about child soldiers in the Congo by Laura Engelbrecht on March 15.


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Feb. 6: Deroy Murdock at the Economic Club


Deroy Murdock, one of the most prolific and influential young conservatives writing today, speaks to the Economic Club

When: February 6, 12:00-1:30 PM

Where: Indiana Convention Center.

You should check out some of Deroy Murdock's articles. He likes his red-bloded conservatism pretty red. Don't expect any surprises from his talk. Expect a lot of the Chamber of Commerce members attending to cheer loudly, but also expect a good number of them shake their heads ... Murdock's hard-hitting approach may increasingly be recognized as self-defeating, only contributing to a polarization that is getting inthe way of solving serious problems. Of course, some people like Murdock would probably respond by saying things aren't polarized enough, that the line between right and wrong, good and evil, is still too fuzzy. And some people like Murdock are making a pretty good living by being polarizing.

We have a chance here in Central Indiana to avoid the sort of polarizing rhetoric that gets in the way of reasoned discourse and problem solving. CHeck out the new group: the American Values Alliance to find out more.

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For information about how to attend this Economic Club luncheon, go here.

Feb. 7: The ACLU discusses “Intelligent Design in Science Class?”


The ACLU’s first “First Tuesday” program at the Indiana Repertory Theatre takes on the controversy over teaching evolution vs. Intelligent Design (ID) in public schools

When: Tuesday February 7, noon to 1:00 PM

Where: Indiana Repertory Theatre, 140 W Washington St. Indianapolis (parking here)

“The ‘First Tuesdays’ program is designed to respond to the demand for respectful and intelligent discussion about issues that are important to our community,” says Fran Quigley, executive director of the ACLU of Indiana. This discussion continues a very interesting conversation begun last fall. Following an IRT performance of the play “Inherit the Wind,” most of the audience stayed for a panel discussion with Alex Oren, director of “The Mighty Cannon,” the local group that is threatening to sue the Hamilton County School District to force it to teach ID; David L. Stocum, Dean Emeritus of the School of Science and Professor of Biology at IUPUI; and Rabbi Sandy Sasso, who has written that evolution (science) and creation (religion) don’t have to conflict. So thoroughly did the audience become engrossed the discussion that when IRT announced that it was time to go home there arose a spontaneous “boo” of protest.

The discussion February 7 returns David Stocum, matching him with William H. Ball, Jr., Director of the Center for Scientific Creation.

What a wave of nostalgia washes over me when I visit the Center for Scientific Creation’s website! These guys are not “intelligent design” proponents, ID probably strays too far from the literal truth of the Bible for the Center for Scientific Creation. In other words, they approach science the same way my Evangelical high school science and history class did. Since Genesis, conclusively proves the world was created in 4004 BC, anything that indicates anything different -- archaeology or history or astronomy or biology -- is misunderstood or an illusion. Who are you going to believe, the Bible or your lying eyes? It’s a view that has interesting implications for the sociology of knowledge, but that’s about as interesting as it gets. At least ID proponents pretend to be scientists, or at least pretend to act the way they think scientists act. The Center for Scientific Creation appears to be pretending to be as scientific as ID scientists … and at that point my head hurts too much to go much further. Some might say that sending David Stocum to debate the Center for Scientific Creation is like using a 6,000 pound smart bomb to swat a fly. I think it's an example of two worlds speaking two very different languages intersecting with one another for an hour.

Well, if you are downtown at noon on the 7th you might want to stop by IRT. You might find the debate entertaining … I fear it will be frustrating. There really are reasons to take ID seriously, although NOT because it is a scientific equal or rival to evolution. I'll quote Bruce Hanson's concise summary of what precludes ID from serious consideration as contributing to science:
  1. ID is not a "theory," at least in the sense scientists use that word. Because of the ambiguity around that word "theory" it makes a comvienent point of attack.
  2. ID isn't falsifiable. That's a large part of what scientists do, attempting to falsify hypotheses and theories.
  3. ID proponents say there must be a designer. So whats the mechanism? Dembski argues that the designer is unembodied .. how does an unembodied designer effect change to a physical universe?

I say we need to take ID seriously because a large and politically influential minority of Americans want it to be taught in public schools. Understanding the fears and anxieties that are driving well-meaning citizens to sabotage education in this way ... that's important. Of course, some politicians are looking for that next wedge issue that will mobilize conservative voters ("ID ... the next 'abortion'?"). And some ID proponents are disingenuous or outright decietful when they they aren't trying to introduce religion into public schools under the guise of "science" .. see this quote by preeminent ID "theorist" William Dembski:

ID is part of God's general revelation. Consequently, it can be understood apart from the Bible. That's why, for instance, the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies invited me to lecture on intelligent design and warmly embraced my message (this happened in October 2003). Just about anyone who is not wedded to a pure materialism agrees that some sort of design or purpose underlies nature. Intelligent design not only gives a voice to these people, but also gives them the tools to dismantle materialism.

Dismantling materialism is a good thing. Not only does intelligent design rid us of this ideology, which suffocates the human spirit, but, in my personal experience, I've found that it opens the path for people to come to Christ. Indeed, once materialism is no longer an option, Christianity again becomes an option. True, there are then also other options. But Christianity is more than able to hold its own once it is seen as a live option. The problem with materialism is that it rules out Christianity so completely that it is not even a live option. Thus, in its relation to Christianity, intelligent design should be viewed as a ground-clearing operation that gets rid of the intellectual rubbish that for generations has kept Christianity from receiving serious
consideration.
The “Scientific Creationism” as will be on display in the first “First Tuesday” is at the far fringes of movement to bash science and non-sectarian public education. If people come away from the ACLU-IN debate thinking Young Earth Scientific Creation is the opponent that should be fought, they will be lulled into a false state of complacency.


In addition to the IRT debate, check out some other events this spring that will more seriously probe the intersection of science and culture, of faith and reason.

Neil deGrasse Tyson’s talk on February 8, should be a good one. Despite being named by President Bush to several panels and commissions, Tyson disagrees with the President’s view of teaching ID: “Science is a philosophy of discovery. Intelligent design is a philosophy of ignorance. You cannot build a program of discovery on the assumption that nobody is smart enough to figure out the answer to a problem.”


Check out cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker on April 12. Or check out David Stocum and some other serious thinkers at the IUPUI seminar March 4 on “The Realms of Science and Faith.”

Looking for some background reading? The Discovery Institute in Seattle is the seedbed of the ID movement. Michael Ruse's "The Evolution-Creation Struggle" has been well-reviewed as an effort to seperate the metaphysics of "evolutionism" from evolutionary theory, although I suspect that won't be enough to defuse the ID movement. An earlier IndyBuzz posting had a long list of recommended readings, check them out.

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Feb. 7: Ed DeLaney addresses the UN’s need for reform and what this reform might look like


One of the smartest and most experienced lawyers around, Ed DeLaney, talks about the outlook for the United Nations as the Indiana Council on World Affairs kicks of its “Great Decisions” series

When: Tuesday February 7, registration at 7:00, program runs 7:30-9:00 PM

Where: Butler University, Pharmacy Building

Bold plans for UN reform lost much of their substance before reaching the 2005 World Summit, but many continue to hope that prospects remain good for securing advances in development and humanitarian programs. Both its supporters and critics recognize the United Nations as an organization in need of critical changes. Disagreements about intervention in Iraq, the oil-for-food-scandal and management issues have fueled the debate about the UN's ability to take on global challenges. What reforms are needed to make the UN more effective?

Ed DeLaney has taught me just about everything worthwhile that I know about the problems with the UN. He has been on the ground, building new legal systems with the cooperation and obstruction of the UN, and thus brings an utterly refreshing perspective to the question. So here are some questions you should expect Ed to answer: What should be the role of the UN Security Council? How much should the US bind itself by Security Council resolutions (or lack of resolutions)? What does the UN do well, and what does it do poorly? Are Americans correct to worry that international law will trump US law, and thus that multilateral organizations such as the UN or the International Criminal Court will supplant the democratically elected government of the United States?

The ICWA's Great Decisions series is free for students. For ICWA members, the series costs $9 for an individual and $14 for couples. For non-members it's $12 for individuals and $17 for a couple. Attending single sessions costs $5. You should get the book of eight fine articles that goes along with the series, it costs $12. Any questions? Contact Mitzi Graham 317-872-4004.

If you like this event, you could hear Ed Delaney talk about UN reform again on May 17. Ed will bring a lawyer's perspective to issues of US policy: you might also be interested in talks about the US-led war on terrorism and international law by Fran Quigley on March 14 and April 12. Sheila Kennedy discusses a similar topic March 1. And on February 19 Sen. Richard Lugar is sure to say some interesting things about the topic.

Want to know more about what is happening with UN reform? Check out recent news articles from Google or Yahoo. The UN keeps you up to date about its reform process. The United Nations Association of the USA (UNA-USA) is a leading center of policy research on the U.N. and global issues; the United Nations Foundation is another. Global Policy Forum has collected resources about UN reform. Looking for a source less supportive of the UN? Try the Heritage Foundation.

Looking for a local expert on UN reform? You can contact Ed DeLaney, or get a hold of John Clark who can suggest several.

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Feb. 8: Neil deGrasse Tyson talks about “The Cosmic Perspective”

Neil deGrasse Tyson, an astrophysicist who writes a monthly column for Natural History magazine, is well known for his ability to explain the universe in terms that most Earthlings can understand, and will deliver the J. James Woods Lecture in the Sciences and Mathematics, “The Cosmic Perspective.”

When: Wednesday February 8, 7:30 PM

Where: Butler University, Clowes Hall

Neil deGrasse Tyson is the first occupant of the Frederick P. Rose Directorship of the Hayden Planetarium where he also teaches. Tyson's professional research interests include star formation, exploding stars, dwarf galaxies, and the structure of our Milky Way. Tyson obtains his data from the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as from telescopes in California, New Mexico, Arizona, and in the Andes Mountains of Chile.

In 2001, Tyson was appointed by President Bush to serve on a 12-member commission that studied the Future of the US Aerospace Industry. The final report was published in 2002 and contained recommendations (for Congress and for the major agencies of the government) that would promote a thriving future of transportation, space exploration, and national security. In 2004, Tyson was once again appointed by President Bush to serve on a 9-member commission on the Implementation of the United States Space Exploration Policy, dubbed the "Moon, Mars, and Beyond" commission. This group navigated a path by which the new space vision can become a successful part of the American agenda.

In addition to dozens of professional publications, Dr. Tyson has written, and continues to write for the public. He is a monthly essayist for Natural History magazine under the title "Universe." And among Tyson's seven books is his memoir The Sky is Not the Limit: Adventures of an Urban Astrophysicist; and Origins: Fourteen Billion Years of Cosmic Evolution, co-written with Donald Goldsmith. Origins is the companion book to the PBS-NOVA 4-part mini-series Origins in which Tyson serves as on-camera host.

Tyson's contributions to the public appreciation of the cosmos have recently been recognized by the International Astronomical Union in their official naming of asteroid "13123 Tyson". On the lighter side, Tyson was voted "Sexiest Astrophysicist Alive" in the 2000 People Magazine "Sexiest Man Alive" issue.

If the issues of science and society fascinate you -- and they should! -- you should check out the "Realms of Science and Religion" conference March 4, and cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker on April 12.

This talk is free and open to the public.

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Feb. 8: Dick Davis talks about the global politics of energy

Electrical engineer Dick Davis discusses "The energy policy conundrum" as part of the Church of the Saviour's "Great Decisions" series

When: Wednesday February 8, 7:00 PM

Where: Church of the Saviour, 6205 Rucker Road Indianapolis

Energy supply and consumption have a significant impact on U.S. politics and economy. The U.S. is more than ever dependent on foreign energy supplies, which are coming at much higher prices. Is reliance on Middle East oil making the U.S. vulnerable to political influence and economic peril? Should the emphasis of U.S. policy be on finding new supplies, securing current sources or reducing its dependence on fossil fuels -- or are all three elements indispensable? How will the rapidly increasing consumption of energy by countries like China affect the U.S. and the world?

Dick Davis is one of my favorite people, this should be good. If you like this topic, there will be other discussions of energy policy on February 21 and about global conflicts and energy security April 26. You also might like to attend a talk about Uzbekistan and Central Asia February 15.

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Feb. 11: Shadows of High Noon: Legacies of an American Icon


A showing and discussion of the classic Western film, "High Noon," at the Eiteljorg Museum

When: Saturday February 11, noon (of course)

Where: Eiteljorg Museum 500 West Washington St. Indianapolis

The story line of High Noon, the 1950s film starring Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly, is a familiar one. The lone lawman stands up to bad guys, despite the lack of support from other members of the community. Scenes from the film have become iconic symbols of America and have been tied to ideas of the Cold War and the defense of democratic freedoms by the United States. And not only the US! One of the greatest political posters of all time was put out by Solidarity for its first free election against the communists in 1989.

Eiteljorg VP and Chief Curatorial Officer James Nottage will discuss how these ideas have been expressed in American culture and how they have influenced other parts of the world are the emphasis of this program. How popular culture has visually expressed the American West of High Noon will be illustrated by slides of seldom seen art works from around the world.

Lunch will focus on foods typical of the frontier American West.

Following the program the film, "High Noon," will be screened in Clowes Court. A free lunch will be given to the first attendee to identify the 20th century intrusion mistakenly included in the film. [Warning: IndyBuzz already knows the answer!] Cost: $25 Eiteljorg members; $35 general public. To make your reservation for High Noon, call (317) 636-9378. Museum members $25, non-members $35. For more information, visit What's Happening/Events at www.eiteljorg.org.

Alert IndyBuzz reader Rollie Cole sends this menu for the day, Kahn's Katering's twist on the traditional cowboy meal of beef, bisquit and beans:

Appetizer
Baked Bean Braised BBQ Short Rib with Mustard and Wild Sage
Baskets filled with: Buttermilk Biscuits with Butter
Entrée
Smoked Beef Stew with Carrots, Rutabaga, Celery and Onion

Dessert
Open Fire Cherry Cobbler with Sweet Cornmeal Crust

Call (317) 636-9378, ext. 1319 for reservations.

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Feb. 14: Sean Foley discusses US-Iran relations


Sean Foley, history professor at DePauw University, discusses "Dealing with Iran" as part of the Indiana council on World Affairs "Great Decisions" series

When: Tuesday February 14, registration at 7:00, program runs 7:30-9:00 PM

Where: Butler University, Pharmacy Building

A conundrum for U.S. Administrations for the past quarter century, Iran has a population that may be the most pro-American in the Middle East, while the Iranian government may be the most anti-American. The election of Iran's conservative president has raised concern that hardliners will shape policies against U.S. interests. How can the U.S. check Iran's influence in Iraq, Afghanistan and other countries in the region? How will the U.S. and the international community mitigate the crisis over Iran's nuclear ambitions?

This event, I believe, marks the Indianapolis debut of DePauw History Prof. Sean Foley. It should be a good one. Prof. Foley specializes in modern Middle East history and Islamic social and political movements. From 2004-2005, Foley was a Royden B. Davis Fellow at Georgetown University , where he earned an M.A. in Arab Studies and a Ph.D. in History. Foley was a Fulbright fellow in Syria and in Turkey in 2002 and 2003. He has published widely on Middle Eastern history and politics, Islamic history, diplomatic history, social and political movements, and terrorism. He is currently working on a monograph, to be published in 2006 by Lynne Rienner Press, which explores the profound challenges facing the Arab Gulf states and the far-reaching effects of these challenges in religion, politics, economics, and gender.

The ICWA's Great Decisions series is free for students. For ICWA members, the series costs $9 for an individual and $14 for couples. For non-members it's $12 for individuals and $17 for a couple. Attending single sessions costs $5. You should get the book of eight fine articles that goes along with the series, it costs $12. Any questions? Contact Mitzi Graham 317-872-4004.

You have other opportunities to learn about Iran, with Great Decisions sessions led by Charlie Winslow February 1 and Milind Thakar April 5. Scott Pegg will cover related terrain in his talk about Turkey on March 8. Check out the performance of music and dance by Sufis (Muslim mystics) on March 16. And the Indianapolis International Film Festival has lined up "Iron Island," a powerful thinly-disguised allegory condemning political corruption in Iran.


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